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CPE CONSULTANTS, LLC
 

Preventing Medication Errors in Pharmacy Practice


THIS KNOWLEDGE-BASED HOME STUDY ACTIVITY HAS BEEN ASSIGNED AN ACPE UNIVERSAL ACTIVITY NUMBER DESIGNATOR OF 05 (PATIENT SAFETY) AND MEETS THE
2.0 CONTACT HOUR CONTIUNING EDUCATION REQUIREMENT IN THE SUBJECT AREA OF PATIENT/MEDICATION SAFETY ESTABLISHED BY SEVERAL STATE BOARDS OF PHARMACY
 
Pharmacists and health care professionals became more aware of the serious problem of medication errors with the release of the report by the Institute of Medication, “To Err is Human-Building a Better Health System” 1 In this report it is estimated that between 44,000 and 98,000 Americans die each year of medical errors in hospitals and as many as 40% of these deaths could have been prevented. This results in an estimated $17 billion to $29 billion in lost wages, disability payments, additional medical care and other costs. A follow-up report by the Institute of Medicine a few years later “Preventing Medication Errors” found that medication errors harm 1.5 million people per year.2 In addition, 400,000 preventable adverse drug events occur per year in hospitals, which equates to about one medication error per patient per day.2  In 2014, the National Council on Patient Information and Education (NCPIE) conducted an online study to determine patient and health professional knowledge and attitudes about the risks of medication and medication safety issues3.  The study found that 62% of patients were not aware of the safety warnings regarding their own medications.   Of those patients who were aware of a safety issue with their medications, 75% did not recall what that warning was or which medication the warning was intended.  Fifty percent of patients in the study responded that they prefer both written and verbal information when receiving a prescription from their physician and 48% prefer both from their pharmacist.  When patients were asked where they receive their information on medication risks and warnings, 59% indicated the Internet, 75% indicated their physician and 55% indicated their pharmacist.   The Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) feels that pharmacists are the most qualified to take the professional responsibility for medication safety and error prevention.4  Based on the data from the NCPIE study, pharmacists have some work to do to better educate their patients on medication safety and risk.     

Fee

$20.00

CE Hours

2.00

CE Units

0.200

Activity Type

  • Knowledge

Target Audience(s)

  • Pharmacist

Accreditation(s)

CPE Consultants, LLC is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education
Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education
 

Requirements for CE Credit

Registrants have the option of taking the pre-test for this activity or skipping the pre-test.  The ACPE provider encourages registrants to complete the pre-test before reviewing the course material.  There is no passing score required on the pre-test and this test is simply used by the ACPE provider to determine both the baseline knowledge of each registrant and to assess the value of the continuing education activity by comparing pre- and post-test results. 
 
Each registrant must read the course material (attached file, "Preventing Medication Errors," located under the Course Material(s) section, successfully pass (80% or higher) the activity post-test and complete the online evaluation form.  Once the registrant has completed these requirements the continuing education credits will be uploaded automatically to CPE Monitor.  The registrant can also print out a hard copy of the statement of credit from their online continuing education account.
 
IMPORTANT: Pharmacy Continuing Education Credit: Continuing education credits are uploaded to CPE monitor immediately after successfully passing the post-test and completing the online evaluation.  Failure to successfully pass the post-test and/or complete the online evaluation within 30 days of registering for this activity, will result in the credits not uploading to CPE Monitor and a forfeiture of the continuing education credits.
 
Please make sure that the eProfile number and date of birth are correct in your online profile.
 
FAILURE TO COMPLETE THE CONTINUING EDUCATION ACTIVITY EVALUATION AND ENTERING AN INCORRECT ePROFILE NUMBER AND / OR DATE OF BIRTH WILL RESULT IN LOSS OF CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDIT.
 
Thank you for your cooperation.
 

Support/Credits

No financial support was provided for this home-study activity.

 

 

 

     Pharmacists and health care professionals became more aware of the serious problem of medication errors with the release of the report by the Institute of Medication, “To Err is Human-Building a Better Health System”.1 In this report it is estimated that between 44,000 and 98,000 Americans die each year of medical errors in hospitals and as many as 40% of these deaths could have been prevented. This results in an estimated $17 billion to $29 billion in lost wages, disability payments, additional medical care and other costs. A follow-up report by the Institute of Medicine a few years later “Preventing Medication Errors” found that medication errors harm 1.5 million people per year.2 In addition, 400,000 preventable adverse drug events occur per year in hospitals, which equates to about one medication error per patient per day.2  In 2014, the National Council on Patient Information and Education (NCPIE) conducted an online study to determine patient and health professional knowledge and attitudes about the risks of medication and medication safety issues3.  The study found that 62% of patients were not aware of the safety warnings regarding their own medications.   Of those patients who were aware of a safety issue with their medications, 75% did not recall what that warning was or which medication the warning was intended.  Fifty percent of patients in the study responded that they prefer both written and verbal information when receiving a prescription from their physician and 48% prefer both from their pharmacist.  When patients were asked where they receive their information on medication risks and warnings, 59% indicated the Internet, 75% indicated their physician and 55% indicated their pharmacist.   The Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) feels that pharmacists are the most qualified to take the professional responsibility for medication safety and error prevention.4  Based on the data from the NCPIE study, pharmacists have some work to do to better educate their patients on medication safety and risk.     

Objectives

  • Describe the process of root cause analysis (RCA), failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) and its application in pharmacy practice
  • Describe the role dangerous abbreviations play in medication errors
  • Describe medication error reduction and prevention procedures
  • Describe ways to improve patient medication safety
  • Examine common errors made by pharmacists and how to prevent them
  • Describe the potential for medication errors with electronic prescribing

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Donald L. Sullivan picture

Donald L. Sullivan, RPh, PhD
Director of Experiential Pharmacy Professor of Clinical Pharmacy, The Ohio State University


Brief Bio : Dr. Sullivan is the Director of Experiential Pharmacy, Professor of Clinical Pharmacy at The Ohio State University. He receives his B.S. in pharmacy from The Ohio State University in 1990, his MS from The Ohio State University in 1991, and his PhD. In Pharmacy Administration from The Ohio State University in 1996. He has published several peer-reviewed articles and five consumer drug reference books. He has taught courses in pharmacy law and OTC products for 16 years. He has done more than 90 professional presentations on pharmacy law and OTC products all across the U.S. He has been voted professor of the year by his students in 14 of his 16 years at Ohio Northern University.
Disclosure : I have no financial relationship to disclose and I will not discuss off label use and/or investigational use in my presentation.

Activity Number

0864-0000-16-023-H05-P

Release Date: Jan 29, 2016
Credit Expiration Date: Jan 29, 2019

Fee

$20.00